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The Condusiv blog shares insight into the issues surrounding file system and data storage performance—and how I/O optimization software is breaking new ground in solving those issues. We cover all topics relating to application and system performance in a personal voice, as a supplement to the formal content you’ll find on the website. You’ll get personal viewpoints on our products and where we see the industry and our company going. We’re excited for the opportunity to share our product knowledge, and hope it evokes thought and discussion. We encourage your comments, and invite you to follow!

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    Here's the situation: Sluggish application performance on one or more of your Windows servers had become so bad as to require intervention. You purchased a license for Condusiv® Diskeeper Server and observed such an amazing performance improvement that you want to deploy Diskeeper® on all your physical servers.

    "But how can I centrally manage the application?" you wonder. And then you see that Condusiv Makes Diskeeper Administrator. Bingo!

    Diskeeper Administrator gives you centralized control over all your managed servers. The solution enables you to deploy, configure and manage Diskeeper Server, Diskeeper Professional for desktop workstations, and some very early versions of V-locity for virtual machines (VMs). Condusiv plans to integrate SSDkeeper into Diskeeper Administrator sometime in the future.
    Note: (V-locity and V-locity Management Console should be used for virtual servers)

    For now, though, let's learn how to deploy and configure Diskeeper Administrator.

    Deployment Prerequisites

    In addition to purchasing a Diskeeper Administrator license, you should consider a volume-license purchase of Diskeeper Server to save money.
    Diskeeper Administrator runs as a Windows service and is a client/server application that uses Microsoft SQL Server for back-end data storage. For a smooth installation experience, I suggest, but not required, having a SQL Server database engine instance already available on the network. Diskeeper Administrator supports the following database versions:

       - SQL Server 2005
       - SQL Server 2008
       - SQL Server 2012

    You can use the free Express Edition if you want; in fact, the Diskeeper Administrator installer can automatically install SQL Server 2012 Express Edition. Notably, more recent SQL Server versions are not yet supported.

    Like any client/server application, you need to keep firewall rules in mind. Diskeeper Administrator uses the following Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) ports:

       - 1434 (for SQL Server)
       - 31029
       - 31036
       - 30137
       - 31056
       - 31096
       - 31116
       - 31176
       - 31196
       - 31216

    All your managed servers should have file and printer sharing enabled, which opens TCP ports 139 and 445, and exposes the ADMIN$ administrative share that is used for Diskeeper push installation. In addition, you should open ports 31038 or 31058 to facilitate management traffic. More details on port use is available in the DK Administrator’s online help.

    Diskeeper Administrator Install and Setup

    The Diskeeper Administrator installer is basically an InstallShield wizard "click-click-next" routine. The real work begins after you lay down the application binaries and start Diskeeper Administrator for the first time.

    Speaking of Windows Server, you can install Diskeeper Administrator on any version from Windows Server 2008 R2 to Windows Server 2016, as well as Windows Client versions from Windows 7 to Windows 10. My environment runs Windows Server 2016 exclusively, and Diskeeper products all run just fine.

    On first launch of the Diskeeper Administrator console (it's an honest-to-goodness Windows desktop application and not a browser portal), you'll see the following requirements dialog:

    Continue reading the full Diskeeper Administrator Quick Start Guide »

     


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    Community Medical Center (CMC) had one initial requirement – find a FAL remediation solution for their MEDITECH electronic health record (EHR) application to maintain 24/7 availability and avoid downtime. What surprised them the most was the extent of the performance boost from using V-locity I/O reduction software.

    “Our doctors and clinicians were losing too much time on basic tasks like waiting on medical images to load, or scanning images, or even just navigating from screen to screen within the application. The easy answer is to buy new server and storage hardware; however, that’s also a very expensive answer. When you’re a small hospital, you need to squeeze every last drop of performance out of your existing infrastructure. Since we don’t have the budget luxury of doing hardware refreshes every three years, we need to get at least five years or more from our storage backend,” said Joe Buckminster, IT Director, Community Medical Center.

    Buckminster continued, “We initially purchased V-locity I/O reduction software to meet an availability requirement, but what surprised us the most was how much value it to added to our aging storage infrastructure by offloading a significant amount of I/O traffic. Not only did we get an immediate performance boost for MEDITECH, but we soon realized that we needed to try V-locity on our other Tier-1 applications like NextGen, MS-SQL, MS Exchange, Citrix XenApp, and others.”

    Joe identified 35 key virtual servers that ran an assortment of different applications, like NextGen EHR (supported by a MS-SQL database), MS Exchange, Citrix XenApp, GE Centricity Perinatal, and others. In aggregate, V-locity offloaded 43% of all read traffic from storage and 29% of write traffic. With well over half a billion I/Os eliminated from going to storage, the median latency savings meant an aggregate of 157 days of cumulative storage I/O time saved across all the servers over a three-month period. When examining the last 24 hours from CMC’s single heaviest workload on a MS-SQL server, V-locity offloaded 48,272,115 I/O operations from storage (48% of read traffic / 47% of write traffic) – a savings of seven hours in storage I/O time

    “There’s no way we would have achieved a 5-year lifecycle on our storage system without V-locity offloading so much I/O traffic from that subsystem. We had no idea how many I/O operations from virtual server to storage were essentially wasted activity due to Windows write inefficiencies chewing up IOPS or hot data that is more effectively served from available DRAM,” said Buckminster.

     

    To read the full story on how V-locity I/O reduction software boosted their EHR and MS-SQL performance, read here: http://learn.condusiv.com/rs/246-QKS-770/images/CS-Community-Medical.pdf


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  • 08/30/17--10:46: Undelete Can Do That Too?
  • You may have already heard countless customers tout the file recovery features of Condusiv’s Undelete® and how IT Pros use it as a recycle bin on file servers for real-time protection, so they don’t have to dig through backups to recover deleted or overwritten files. Although this is Undelete’s primary function, Undelete provides more than just this. 

    What most people do not know is that Undelete also provides features to keep your data secure and visibility into who deletes files from file servers.

    When a file is deleted, many assume that file data is now safe from being seen by others. Not so fast. When data gets deleted on a Windows volume, the data does not get removed. The space where that file data was residing is just marked as available for use, but the original file data is still there and will remain there until that space is overwritten by some other file data. That may or may not happen for quite a while. This means, that ‘deleted’ file data could still be potentially read. 

    So, what do you do if you really want your file data gone when you delete it?  Undelete has the answer with two features. The first feature is “SecureDelete.”  When a file is deleted, SecureDelete will first over-write the file to help ensure it is unrecoverable. In fact, this is done by overwriting it with a specific bit pattern specified for this purpose by the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) for the Department of Defense (DOD).  The second feature is “Wipe Free Space”, which will overwrite any free space on a selected volume, using the same specific bit patterns as SecureDelete to clear out any previously written data in that free space.

    Now, with these two features, when you delete a file, you know it is now virtually impossible to read/recover any of that data from that volume.

    Along with file security, there are customers using Undelete as another precautionary security: check how many files are being deleted from file shares and by whom. If they ever detect an abnormal, substantially high number of files being deleted, that raises a flag for them to investigate further.

    Although Undelete is usually purchased to recover files, others use it to securely delete files and track back any deleted files to the person who did it.


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    In a testament to Condusiv's longstanding 20+ year relationship with Microsoft® as a Gold Partner and provider of technologies to Microsoft over the years, Condusiv® became the first software vendor awarded the stringent certification of MS-SQL Server I/O Reliability joining a very short list containing the likes of Dell® / EMC®, IBM® and HPE®.

    Microsoft developed the SQL Server I/O Reliability Program to ensure the reliability, integrity, and availability of vendor products with SQL Server. The program includes a set of requirements that, when complied with and approved by a Microsoft committee of engineers, ensure the product is fully reliable and highly available for SQL Server systems. The certification applies to SQL Server running on Windows Server 2008R2 and later (the most current 2016 release included).

    V-locity® Certified for SQL I/O Reliability and Demonstrates Significant SQL Performance Gains

    The program itself does not require performance characteristics of products, but it does require I/O testing to exhibit the reliability and integrity of the product. To that end, the full report links to a summary of before/after performance results from a HammerDB test (the preferred load test to measure MS-SQL performance) on Azure to demonstrate the gains of using V-locity I/O reduction software for SQL Server 2016 on Azure’s Windows Server 2016 Data Center Edition. While transactions per minute increased 28.5% and new orders per minute increased by 28.7%, gains were considered modest by Condusiv’s standards since only a limited amount memory was available to be leveraged by V-locity’s patented DRAM caching engine. The typical V-locity customer sees 50% or better performance improvement to SQL applications. The Azure test system configured by Microsoft did not boost available memory to showcase the full power of what V-locity can do with as little of 2-4GB of memory.

    To read the full report CLICK HERE

     


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    There’s a storm brewing and chances are, it’s going to hit your data center or cloud site.

    It’s the tsunami of data that is washing over the IT world and it is just going to get worse. That’s because there is an insatiable demand for data: big data, ERP, CRM, BI, EHR, and of course all of that social media and video that is flooding global organizations like a bursting dam.

    I’ll admit it, I’m a dinosaur. I got started in the IT industry in the late 1970’s at IBM. So I can rightly say that I’ve seen a lot in the past 40 years. When I started, it was the heyday of the mainframe era. Data processing was still practically a priesthood back then. It wasn’t for everyone. Bill Gates would not proclaim “Information at your fingertips” for at least another dozen years.

    Clearly, we’ve come a long way in four decades. The three driving factors – exponentially increased compute power, nearly unlimited storage, and the internet have delivered computing nirvana. Or so it would seem. But with abundance comes challenges. Frankly, we are now awash in data. The tsunami of available information is swamping IT environments worldwide. And even with huge advances in the three driving factors (compute, storage and the internet) IT is experiencing performance bottlenecks on an increasing basis. Recently, we conducted a survey of 1400 IT professionals and fully 27% said they are experiencing performance problems that are causing user complaints and slowdowns.

    As usual, our industry is innovating to keep up. Cloud based computing that takes advantage of huge data centers as well as innovation in storage, compute power and connectivity has kept up with much of the demand. However, most of these improvements focus on hardware – all flash storage arrays; 64-core servers; hyper-convergence. But there’s one other performance innovation that is often overlooked: Software.

    Software innovation that takes advantage of existing and new hardware capabilities can significantly increase performance without the cost of additional hardware. Even with an all flash storage back-end, software like ours can significantly increase performance and extend the life of the hardware. The cost-benefit can be tremendous. Imagine getting a 50% boost in performance (or even 2-3X) without buying a single additional piece of hardware. CEOs and CFOs love that kind of benefit.  I know, because that is what we hear from our customers every day.

    So, before you get swamped by the tsunami of data that’s lapping at your data center, consider a software solution to the problem. It can help you stay afloat without having to buy a new yacht!

     


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    I chose to use the word “Revolution” instead of “Evolution” because, with all due modesty, our patented technology has been more a series of leaps to stay ahead of performance-crushing bottlenecks. After all, our company purpose as stated by our Founder, Craig Jensen, is:

    “The purpose of our company is to provide computer technology that enormously increases

    the production and income of an area.”

    We have always been about improving your production. We know your systems are not about having really cool hardware but rather about maximizing your organization’s production. Our passion has been about eliminating the stops, slows and stalls to your application performance and instead, to jack up that performance and give you headroom for expansion. Now, most of you know us by our reputation for Diskeeper®. What you probably don’t know about us is our leadership in system performance software.

    We’ve been at this for 35 years with a laser focus. As an example, for years hard drives were the common storage technology and they were slow and limited in size, so we invented numerous File System Optimization technologies such as Defragmentation, I-FAAST®1 and Directory Consolidation to remove the barriers to getting at data quickly. As drive sizes grew, we added new technologies and jettisoned those that no longer gave bang for the buck. Technologies like InvisiTasking® were invented to help maximize overall system performance, while removing bottlenecks.

    As SSDs began to emerge, we worked with several OEMs to take advantage of SSDs to dramatically reduce data access times as well as reducing the time it took to boot systems and resume from hibernate. We created technologies to improve SSD longevity and even worked with manufacturers on hybrid drives, providing hinting information, so their drive performance and endurance would be world class.

    As storage arrays were emerging we created technologies to allow them to better utilize storage resources and pre-stage space for future use. We also created technologies targeting performance issues related to file system inefficiencies without negatively affecting storage array technologies like snapshots.

    When virtualization was emerging, we could see the coming VM resource contention issues that would materialize. We used that insight to create file system optimization technologies to deal with those issues before anyone coined the phrase “I/O Blender Effect”.

    We have been doing caching for a very long time2. We have always targeted removal of the I/Os that get in your applications path to data along with satisfying the data from cache that delivers performance improvements of 50-300% or more. Our goal was not caching your application specific data, but rather to make sure your application could access its data much faster. That’s why our unique caching technology has been used by leading OEMs.

    Our RAM-based caching solutions include dynamic memory allocation schemes to use resources that would otherwise be idle to maximize overall system performance. When you need those resources, we give them back. When they are idle, we make use of them without your having to adjust anything for the best achievable performance. “Set It and Forget It®” is our trademark for good reason.

    We know that staying ahead of the problems you face now, with a clear understanding of what will limit your production in 3 to 5 years, is the best way we can realize our company purpose and help you maximize your production and thus your profitability. We take seriously having a clear vision of where your problems are now and where they will be in the future. As new hardware and software technologies roll out, we will be there removing the new barriers to your performance then, just as we do now.

    1. I-FAAST stands for Intelligent File Access Acceleration Sequencing Technology, a technology designed to take advantage of different performing regions on storage to allow your hottest data to be retrieved in the fastest time.

    2. If I can personally brag, I’ve created numerous caching solutions over a period of 40 years.


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    After surveying thousands of IT professionals, we’ve found that the vast majority agree that Windows performance degrades over time – they just don’t agree on how much. Unbeknown to most is what the problem actually is, which is I/O degradation as the size of writes and reads become excessively smaller than they should. This inefficiency is akin to moving a gallon of water across a room with dixie cups instead of a single gallon jug. Even if you have all-flash storage and can move those dixie cups quickly, you are still not processing data nearly as fast as you could.

    In the same surveys, we’ve also found that the vast majority of IT professionals are aware of the performance penalty of the “I/O blender” effect in a virtual environment, which is the mixing and randomizing of I/O streams from the disparate virtual machines on the same host. What they don’t agree on is how much. And, they are not aware of how the issue is compounded by Windows write inefficiencies.

    Now that the latest Condusiv in-product dashboard has been deployed across thousands of customer systems who have upgraded their Condusiv I/O reduction software to the latest version, customers are getting their first-ever granular view into what I/O reduction software is doing for their systems in terms of seeing the exact percentage and number of read and write I/O operations eliminated from storage and how much I/O time that saves any given system or group of systems. Ultimately, it’s a picture into the size of the problem – all the I/O traffic that is mere noise – all the unnecessary I/O that dampens system performance.

    In our surveys, we found IT professionals all over the map on the size of the performance penalty from inefficiencies. Some are quite positive the performance penalty is no more than 10%. More put that range at 20%. Most put it at 30%. Then it dips back down with fewer believing a 40% penalty with the fewest throwing the dart at 50%.

    As it turns out, our latest version has been able to drop a pin on that.

    There are variances that move the extent of the penalty on any given workload such as system configuration and/or workload behavior. Some systems might be memory constrained, some workloads might be too light to matter, etc.

    However, after thousands of installs over the last several months, we see a very consistent range on the vast majority of systems in which 30-40% of all I/O traffic is being offloaded from underlying storage with our software. Not only does that represent an immediate performance boost for users, but it also means 30-40% of I/O headroom is handed back to the storage subsystem that can now use those IOPS for other things.

    The biggest factor to consider is the 30-40% improvement number represents systems where memory has not been increased beyond the typical configuration that most administrators use. Customers who offload 50% or more of I/O traffic from storage are the ones with read heavy workloads who beef up memory server-side to get more from the software. For every additional 1-2GB of memory added, another 10-25% of read traffic is offloaded. Some customers are more aggressive and leverage as much memory as possible server-side to offload 90% or more I/O traffic on read-heavy applications.

    As expensive as new all-flash systems are, how much sense does it make to pay for all those IOPS only to allow 30-40% of those IOPS to be chewed up by unnecessary, noisy I/O? By addressing the two biggest penalties that dampen performance (Windows write inefficiencies compounded by the “I/O blender” effect), Condusiv I/O reduction software ensures optimal performance and protects the CapEx investments made into servers and storage by extending their useful life.


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    Here’s a nightmare scenario…a user accidentally deletes irreplaceable or valued files from a network share, and there is no way to recover the data because:

    >The file was created or modified then deleted AFTER the last valid backup/snapshot was taken.

    >There is NO valid backup or snapshot to recover the data.

    >There was NO real-time recovery software like Condusiv’s Undelete® already installed on the file server

    >Sending the disk to a professional data recovery center is COSTLY and TIME-CONSUMING.

    What do you do? Well, you may be in luck with a little known feature in Condusiv’s Undelete software product known as “Emergency Undelete.” On NTFS (New Technology File system) formatted volumes, which is the default file system used by Windows, there is an unfamiliar characteristic that can be leveraged to recover your lost data.

    When a file gets deleted from a Windows volume, the data has not yet been physically removed from the drive. The space where that file data was residing is merely marked as “deleted” or available for use. The original data is there and will remain there until that space is overwritten by new data. That may or may not happen for quite a while. By taking the correct steps, there is an extremely good chance that this ‘deleted’ file can still be recovered. This is where Emergency Undelete comes in.

    Emergency Undelete can find deleted files that have not yet been over-written by other files and allow you to recover them. To increase your chances of recovering lost data, here are some best practices to follow as soon as the files have been accidentally deleted.

    1. Immediately, reduce or do away with any write activity on the volume(s) you are trying to recover the deleted files from. This will improve your chances of recovering the deleted files.

    2. Get Condusiv’s Undelete to leverage its Emergency Undelete feature.  Emergency Undelete is part of the Undelete product package.

    3. REMEMBER: You want to prevent any write activity on the volume(s) you are trying to recover the deleted files from, so if you are trying to recover lost files from your system volume, then do one of the following:

    a. Copy the Undelete product package to that system, but to a different volume than the one you are recovering lost files from. Run the Undelete install package and it will allow you to run Emergency Undelete directly to recover the lost files.

      

    b. If you do not have an extra volume on that system, then place the Undelete product package on a different system, run it and Emergency Undelete will allow you to place the Emergency Undelete package onto a CD or a USB memory stick. You can then place the CD/Memory stick on the system you need to recover from and run it to recover the lost files.

     

     

    Now if the lost files do not reside on the system volume, you can just place the Undelete product package on the system volume, run it and select to run Emergency Undelete directly to recover the lost files.

    4. When recovering the lost files, recover them to a different volume.

    These same steps will also work on FAT (File Allocation Table) formatted storage that is used in many of the memory cards in cameras and phones. So, if some irreplaceable photos or videos were accidentally deleted, you can use these same steps to recover these too. Insert the memory card onto your Windows system, then use Emergency Undelete to recover the lost photos. 

    Emergency Undelete has saved highly valuable Microsoft Office documents and priceless photos for thousands of users. It can help in your next emergency, too.

     


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    By following the best practices outlined here, we can virtually guarantee a 2X or faster boost in your MS-SQL performance with our I/O reduction software.

      1) Don’t just run our I/O reduction software on the SQL Server instances but also on the application servers that run on top of MS-SQL

    - It’s not just SQL performance that needs improvement, but the associated application servers that communicate with SQL. Our software will eliminate a minimum of 30-40% of the I/O traffic from those systems.

      2) Run our I/O reduction software on all the non-SQL systems on the same host/hypervisor

    - Sometimes a customer is only concerned with improving their SQL performance, so they only install our I/O reduction software on the SQL Server instances. Keep in mind, the other VMs on the same host/hypervisor are interfering with the performance of your SQL instances due to chatty I/O that is contending for the same storage resources. Our software eliminates a minimum of 30-40% of the I/O traffic from those systems that is completely unnecessary, so they don’t interfere with your SQL performance.

    - Any customer that is on the core or host pricing model is able to deploy the software to an unlimited number of guest machines on the same host. If you are on per system pricing, consider migrating to a host model if your VM density is 7 or greater.

      3) Cap MS-SQL memory usage, leaving at least 8GB left over

    - Perhaps the largest SQL inefficiency is related to how it uses memory. SQL is a memory hog. It takes everything you give it then does very little with it to actually boost performance, which is why customers see such big gains with our software when memory has been tuned properly. If SQL is left uncapped, our software will not see any memory available to be used for cache, so only our write optimization engine will be in effect. Moreover, most DB admins cap SQL, leaving 4GB for the OS to use according to Microsoft’s own best practice.

    - However, when using our software, it is best to begin by capping SQL a little more aggressively by leaving 8GB. That will give plenty to the OS, and whatever is leftover as idle will be dynamically leveraged by our software for cache. If 4GB is available to be used as cache by our software, we commonly see customers achieve 50% cache hit rates. It doesn’t take much capacity for our software to drive big gains.

      4) Consider adding more memory to the SQL Server

    - Some customers will add more memory then limit SQL memory usage to what it was using originally, which leaves the extra RAM left over for our software to use as cache. This also alleviates concerns about capping SQL aggressively if you feel that it may result in the application being memory starved. Our software can use up to 128GB of DRAM. Those customers who are generous in this approach on read-heavy applications get into otherworldly kind of gains far beyond 2X with >90% of I/O served from DRAM. Remember, DRAM is 15X faster than SSD and sits next to the CPU.

      5) Monitor the dashboard for a 50% reduction in I/O traffic to storage

    - When our dashboard shows a 50% reduction in I/O to storage, that’s when you know you have properly tuned your system to be in the range of 2X faster gains to the user, barring any network congestion issues or delivery issues.

    - As much as capping SQL at 8GB may be a good place to start, it may not always get you to the desired 50% I/O reduction number. Monitor the dashboard to see how much I/O is being offloaded and simply tweak memory usage by capping SQL a little more aggressively. If you feel you may be memory constrained already, then add a little more memory, so you can cap more aggressively. For every 1-2GB of memory added, another 10-25% of read traffic will be offloaded.

     

    Not a customer yet? Download a free trial of Condusiv I/O reduction software and apply these best practice steps at www.condusiv.com/try

     


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    Now that many MEDITECH hospitals have gone all-flash for their backend storage, one of the most common questions we field is whether or not there is still downtime risk from the File Attribute List (FAL) growth issue if the data physically lives on solid-state drives (SSDs).

    The main reason this question comes up is because MEDITECH requires “defragmentation,” which most admins insinuate as only being a requirement for a spinning disk backend. That misnomer couldn’t be further from the truth as the FAL issue has nothing to do with the backend media but rather the file system itself. Clearly, defragmentation processes are damaging to solid-state media, which is why MEDITECH hospitals turn to Condusiv’s V-locity® I/O reduction software that prevents fragmentation from occurring in the first place and has special engines designed for MEDITECH environments to remediate the FAL from reaching its size limit and causing unscheduled downtime.

    The File Attribute List is a Windows NTFS file metadata structure referred to as the FAL. ThFAstructure capointdifferentypeofilattributessucasecuritattributeostandarinformatiosuch acreatioanmodificatiodateandmosimportantlythactuadatcontainewith ithfileFoexamplethFAkeeps tracowheralthdatifothfileThFAactuallcontains pointers to file records thaindicatthlocatioothfildatothvolumeIthadathatbe storeadifferenlogic allocationothvolume (i.e.fragmentation), morpointerarrequired. This iturincreasethsizothFALHereiliethproblemthFAL sizhaauppelimitatioo256KB which is comprised of 8192 attribute entriesWhethalimiireachednmorpointercan be added, whicmeans Nmore datcan baddetthfileAnd, iit is a foldefile whickeeps tracoalthfiletharesidundethafolderNmorfilecabaddeundethafoldefile. Once this occurs, the application crashes, leading to a best case scenario of several hours of unscheduled downtime to resolve.

    Although this blog points out MEDITECH customers experiencing this issue, we have seen this FAL problem occur within non-MEDITECH environments like MS-Exchange and MS-SQL, with varying types of backend storage media from HDDs to all-flash arrays. So, what can be done about it?

    The logical solution would be–why not just defragment the volume? Wouldn’t that decrease the number of pointers and decrease the FAL size? The problem is that traditional defragmentation actually causes the FAL to grow in size! While it can decrease the number of pointers, it will not decrease the FAL size, but in fact, it can cause the FAL size to groeven larger, making the problem worse even though you are attempting to remediate it.

    The only proprietary solution to solve this problem is by using Condusiv’s V-locity® for virtual servers or Diskeeper® Server for physical servers. Included is a special technology called MediWrite®, which helps suppress this issue from occurring in the first place and provides special handling if it has already occurred. MediWrite includes:

    >Unique FAL handling: As indicated above,traditional methods of defragmentation will cause the FAL to groeven further in size. MediWrite will detect when files have FAL size issues and will use proprietary methods to prevent FAL growth. This is the only engine of its kind in the industry.

    >Unique FAL safe file movement:  V-locity and Diskeeper’s free space consolidation engines automatically detect FAL size issues and automatically deploy the MediWrite feature to resolve.

    >Unique FAL growth prevention: Along with MediWrite, V-locity and Diskeeper contain another very important technology called IntelliWrite® which automatically prevents new fragmentation from occurring. By preventing new fragmentation from occurring, IntelliWrite minimizes any further FAL size growth issues.

    >Unique Offline FAL Consolidation tool: Any MEDITECH hospital that already has an FAL issue can use the embedded offline tool to shrink the FAL-IN-USE size in a very short time (~5 min) as opposed to manual processes that take several hours.

    >V-locity and Diskeeper have been endorsed by MEDITECH. Click Here to view.

     

     


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    Since the news broke on the Intel CPU security flaw, we have fielded customer concerns about the potential impact to our software and worries of increased contention for CPU cycles if less CPU power1 is available after the patches issued by affected vendors.

    Let us first simply state there is no overhead concern regarding Condusiv software related to software contention for fewer CPU cycles post-patch. If any user has concerns about CPU overhead from Condusiv software, then it is important that we communicate how Condusiv software is architected to use CPU resources in the first place (explained below) such that it is not an issue.

    Google reported this issue to Intel, AMD and ARM on Jun 1, 2017.  The issue became public Jan 3, 2018.  The issue affects most Intel CPUs dating back to 1995.  Most OSes released a patch this week to mitigate the risk.  Also, firmware updates are expected soon.  A report about this flaw from the Google Project Zero team can be found at:

    https://googleprojectzero.blogspot.com/2018/01/reading-privileged-memory-with-side.html

    Before discussing the basic vulnerabilities and any impact the security flaw or patch has or doesn’t have on V-locity®/SSDkeeper®/Diskeeper® (or how our software actually proves beneficial), let me first address the performance hits anticipated due to patches in OSes and/or firmware.  While the details are being tightly held, probably to keep hackers from being able to exploit the vulnerabilities, the consensus seems to be that the fixes in the OSes (Windows Linux, etc.) will have a potential of reducing performance by 5%-30%1.  A lot of this depends on how the system is being used.  For most dedicated systems/applications the consensus appears to be that the affect will be negligible.  That is likely due to the fact that most of those systems already have excess compute capability, so the user just won’t experience a noticeable slowdown.  Also, they aren’t doing lots of things concurrently.

    The real issue comes up for servers where there are multiple accessors/applications hitting on the server.  They will experience the greatest degradation as they will likely have the most number of overlapping data access.  The following article indicates that the biggest performance hits will happen on reads from storage and on SSDs. 

    https://www.pcworld.com/article/3245606/security/intel-x86-cpu-kernel-bug-faq-how-it-affects-pc-mac.html

    So what about V-locity/Diskeeper/SSDkeeper?

    As previously mentioned, we can state that there is not increased CPU contention or negative overhead impact by Condusiv software. Condusiv background operations run at low priority, which means only otherwise idle and available CPU cycles are used. This means that despite whatever CPU horsepower is available (a lot or little), Condusiv software is unobtrusive on server performance because its patented Invisitasking® technology only uses free CPU cycles. If computing is ever completely bound by other tasks, Condusiv software sits idle so there is NO negative intrusion or impact on server resources. The same can be said about our patented DRAM caching engine (IntelliMemory®) as it only uses memory that is otherwise idle and not being used – zero contention for resources.

    However, if storage reads slow down due to the fix (per the PC World article), our software will certainly overcome a significant amount of the lost performance since eliminating I/O traffic in the first place is what our software is designed to do. Telemetry data across thousands of systems demonstrates our software eliminates 30-40% of noisy and completely unnecessary I/O traffic on typically configured systems2. In fact, those who add just a little more DRAM on important systems to better leverage the tier-0 caching strategy, see a 50% or more reduction, which pushes them into the 2X faster gains and higher.

    Those organizations who are concerned about loss of read performance from their SSDs due to the chip fixes and patches need only do one thing to mitigate that concern – simply allocate more DRAM to important systems. Our software will pick up the additional available memory to enhance your tier-0 caching layer. For every 2GB of memory added, we typically see a conservative 25% of read traffic offloaded from storage. That figure is often times 35-40% and even as high as 50% depending on the workload. Since our behavioral analytics engine sits at the application layer, we are able to cache very effectively with very little cache churn. And since DRAM is 15X faster than SSD, that means only a small amount of capacity can drive very big gains. Simply monitor the in-product dashboard to watch your cache hit rates rise with additional capacity.

    Regarding the vulnerabilities themselves, for a very long time, memory in the CPU chip itself has been a LOT faster than system memory (DRAM).  As a result, chip manufacturers have done several things to help take advantage of CPU speed increases.  For the purpose of this paper, I will be discussing the following 2 approaches that were used to improve performance:

    1. Speculative execution
    2. CPU memory cache

    These mechanisms to improve performance opened up the security vulnerabilities being labeled “Spectre” and “Meltdown”.

    Speculative execution is a technology whereby the CPU prefetches machine instructions and data from system memory (typically DRAM) for the purpose of predicting likely code execution paths.  The CPU can pre-execute various potential code paths.  This means that by the time the actual code execution path is determined, it has often already been executed.  Think of this like coming to a fork in the road as you are driving.  What if your car had already gone down both possible directions before you even made a decision as to which one you wanted to take?  By the time you decided which path to take, your car would have already been significantly further on the way regardless of which path you ultimately chose. 

    Of course, in our world, we can’t be at two places at one time, so that can’t happen.  However, a modern CPU chip has lots of unused execution cycles due to synchronization, fetching data from DRAM, etc.  These “wait states” present an opportunity to do other things. One thing is to figure out likely code that could be executed and pre-execute it.  Even if that code path wasn’t ultimately taken, all that happened is that execution cycles that would otherwise have been wasted, just tried those paths even though they didn’t need to be tried.  And with modern chips, they can execute lots of these speculative code paths. 

    Worst case – No harm No foul, right?  Not quite.  Because the code, and more importantly the DRAM data needed for that code, got fetched it is in the CPU and potentially available to software.  And, the data from DRAM got fetched without checking if it was legal for this program to read it.  If the guess was correct, your system increased performance a LOT!  BUT, since memory (that may not have had legal access based on memory protection) was pre-fetched, a very clever program could take advantage of this.  Google was able to create a proof of concept for this flaw.  This is the “Spectre” case.

    Before you panic about getting hacked, realize that to effectively find really useful information would require extreme knowledge of the CPU chip and the data in memory you would be interested in.  Google estimates that an attack on a system with 64GB of RAM would require a software setup cycle of 10-30 minutes.  Essentially, a hacker may be able to read around 1,500 bytes per second – a very small amount of memory.  The hacker would have to attack specific applications for this to be effective. 

    As the number of transistors in a chip grew dramatically, it became possible to create VERY large memory caches on the CPU itself.  Referencing memory from the CPU cache is MUCH faster than accessing the data from the main system memory (DRAM).  The “Meltdown” flaw proof of concept was able to access this data directly without requiring the software to have elevated privileges. 

    Again, before getting too excited, it is important to think through what memory is in the CPU cache.  To start with, current chips typically max out around 8MB of cache on chip.  Depending on the type of cache, this is essentially actively used memory.  This is NOT just large swaths of DRAM.  Of course, the exploit fools the chip caching algorithms to think that the memory the attack wants to read is being actively used.  According to Google, it takes more than 100 CPU cycles to cause un-cached data to become cached.  And that is in CPU word size chunks – typically 8 bytes.

    So what about V-locity/Diskeeper/SSDkeeper?

    Our software runs such that we are no more or less vulnerable than any other application/software component.  Data in the NTFS File System Cache and in SQL Server’s cache are just as vulnerable to being read as data in our IntelliMemory cache.  The same holds true for Oracle or any other software that caches data in DRAM.  And, your typical anti-virus has to analyze file data, so it too may have data in memory that could be read from various data files. However, as the chip flaws are fixed, our I/O reduction software provides the advantage of making up for lost performance, and more.


    1https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/01/02/intel_cpu_design_flaw/
    2 http://blog.condusiv.com/post/2017/10/25/New-Dashboard-Finally-Answers-the-Big-Question.aspx


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    We just completed our 4th annual I/O Performance Survey from 870 IT Professionals. This is one of the industry’s largest studies of its kind and reveals the latest trends in applications driving performance demands, and how IT Professionals are responding.

    The survey results consist of 20 detailed questions designed to identify the impact of I/O growth in the modern IT environment. In addition to multiple choice questions, the survey included optional open responses, allowing a respondent to provide commentary on why they selected a particular answer. All of the individual responses have been compiled across 68 pages to help readers dive deeply into any question.

    The most interesting year over year take away when comparing the 2018 report against the 2017 report is that IT Professionals cite worsening performance from applications sitting on MS-SQL despite larger investments in multi-core servers and all-flash storage. More than 1 in 4 respondents cite staff and customer complaints regarding sluggish SQL queries and reports. No Condusiv customer was included in the survey.

    Below is a word cloud representing hundreds of answers to visually show the applications IT Pros are having the most trouble to support from a performance standpoint.

    To see what has either grown or shrunk, below is the same word cloud from 2017 responses.

     

    The full report can be accessed by visiting http://learn.condusiv.com/IO-Performance-Study.html

    As much as organizations continue to reactively respond to performance challenges by purchasing expensive new server and storage hardware, our V-locity® I/O reduction software offers a far more efficient path by guaranteeing to solve the toughest application performance challenges on I/O intensive systems like MS-SQL. This means organizations are able to offload 50% of I/O traffic from storage that is nothing but mere noise chewing up IOPS and dampening performance. As soon as we open up 50% of that bandwidth to storage, sluggish performance disappears and now there’s far more storage IOPS to be used for other things.

    To learn more about how V-locity I/O reduction software eliminates the two big I/O inefficiencies in a virtual environment see 2-min Video: Condusiv I/O Reduction Software Overview

     


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    Condusiv is pleased to announce the release of V-locity® 7.0, Diskeeper® 18, and SSDkeeper 2.0 that smash the I/O Performance Gap on Windows servers and PCs as growing volumes of data continue to outpace the ability of underlying server and storage hardware to meet performance SLAs on mission critical workloads like MS-SQL.

    The new 2018 editions of V-locity, Diskeeper, and SSDkeeper come with “no reboot” capabilities and enhanced reporting that offers a single pane view of all systems to show the exact benefit of I/O reduction software to each system in terms of number of noisy I/Os eliminated, percentage of read and write traffic offloaded from storage, and, most importantly, how much time is saved on each system as a result. It is also now easier than ever to quickly identify systems underperforming from a caching standpoint that could use more memory.

    When a minimum of 30-40% I/O traffic from any Windows server is completely unnecessary, nothing but mere noise chewing up IOPS and throughput, it needs to be easy to see the exact levels of inefficiency on individual systems and what it means in terms of I/O reduction and “time saved” when Condusiv software is deployed to eliminate those inefficiencies. Since many customers choose to add a little more memory on key systems like MS-SQL to get even more from the software, it is now clearly evident what 50% or more reduction in I/O traffic actually means.

    Our recent 4th annual I/O Performance Survey (no Condusiv customers included) found that MS-SQL performance problems are at their worst level in 4 years despite heavy investments in hardware infrastructure. 28% of mid-sized and large enterprises receive regular complaints from users regarding sluggish SQL-based applications. This is simply due to the growth of I/O outpacing the hardware stack’s ability to keep up. This is why it is more important than ever to consider I/O reduction software solutions that guarantee to solve performance issues instead of reactively throwing expensive new servers or storage at the problem.

    Not only are the latest versions of V-locity, Diskeeper, and SSDkeeper easier to deploy and manage with “no reboot” capabilities, but reporting has been enhanced to enable administrators to quickly see the full value being provided to each system along with memory tuning recommendations for even more benefit.

    A single pane view lists out all systems with associated workload data, memory data, and benefit data from I/O reduction software and lists systems as red, yellow, and green according to caching effectiveness to help administers quickly identify and prioritize systems that could use a little more memory to achieve a 50% or more reduction in I/O to storage.

    Regarding the new “no reboot” capabilities, this is something that the engineering team has been attempting to crack for some time.  Per Rick Cadruvi, SVP, Engineering, “All storage filter drivers require a reboot, which is problematic for admins who manage software across thousands of servers. However, due to our extensive knowledge of Windows Kernel internals dating back to Windows NT 3.51, we were able to find a way to properly synchronize and handle the load/unload sequences of our driver transparently to other drivers in the storage stack so as not to require a reboot when deploying or updating Condusiv software.”

    This means that customers who are currently on V-locity 5.3 and higher or Diskeeper 15 and higher are able to upgrade to the latest version without a reboot. Customers on older versions will have to uninstall, reboot, then install the new version.

    "As much as Condusiv I/O reduction software has been a real benefit to our applications running across 2,500+ Windows servers, we are happy to see a no reboot version of the software released so it is now truly "Set It & Forget It"®. My team is happy they no longer have to wrestle down a reboot window for hundreds of servers in order to update or deploy Condusiv software," said Blake W. Smith, MSME, System Director, Enterprise Infrastructure, CHRISTUS Health.

     


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    In a world of 24/7 uptime and rare reboot windows, one of our biggest challenges as a company has simply been getting our own customers upgraded to the latest version of our I/O reduction software.

    In the last year, we have done dashboard review sessions with a substantial number of customers to demonstrate the power of our latest versions to hybrid and all-flash arrays, hyperconverged systems, Azure/AWS, local SSDs, and more. However, many remain undone simply because customers can’t find the time for reboot windows to upgrade to the latest versions with the most powerful engines and new benefits dashboard. This has been particularly challenging for customers with hundreds to thousands of servers.

    Even though we own the trademark term, “Set It and Forget It®,” there was always one aspect that wasn’t, and that’s the fact that it required a reboot to install or upgrade.

    Herein lies the problem – important components of our software sit at the storage driver level.  At least to the best of our knowledge, all other software vendors who sit at that layer also require a reboot to install or upgrade.  So, consider our engineering challenge to take on a project most people wouldn’t know was even solvable.

    Let’s start with an explanation as to why this barrier existed.  Our software contains several filter drivers that allow us to implement leading edge performance enhancing technologies.  Some of them act at the Windows File System level.  Windows has long provided a Filter Manager that allows developers to create File System and Network filter drivers that can be loaded and unloaded without requiring a reboot.  You will quickly recognize that Anti-Malware and Data Backup/Recovery software tends to be the principle targets for this Filter Manager.  There are also products such as data encryption that benefit from the Windows Filter Manager.  And, as it turns out, we benefit because some of our filter drivers run above the File System.

    However, sometimes a software product needs to be closer to the physical hardware itself.  This allows a much broader view of what is going on with the actual I/O to the physical device subsystem.  There are quite a few software products that need this bigger view.  It turns out that we do also.  One of the reasons, is to allow our patented IntelliMemory® caching software to eliminate a huge amount of noisy I/O that creates substantial, yet preventable, bottlenecks to your application.  This is I/O that your application wouldn’t even recognize as problematic to its performance, nor would you.   Because we have a global view, we can eliminate a large percentage of I/Os from having to go to storage, while using very limited system resources.  We also have other technologies that benefit from our telemetry disk filter that helps us see a more global picture of storage performance and what is actually causing bottlenecks.  This allows us to focus our efforts on the true causes of those bottlenecks, giving our customers the greatest bang for their buck.  Because we collect excellent empirical data about what is causing the bottlenecks, we can apply very limited and targeted system resources to deliver very significant storage performance increases.  Keep in mind, the limited CPU cycles we use operate at lowest priority and we only use resources that are otherwise idle, so the benefits of our engines are completely non-intrusive to overall server performance.

    Why does the above matter?  Well, the Microsoft Filter Manager doesn’t provide support for most driver stacks and this includes the parts of the storage driver stack below the File System.  That means that our disk filter drivers couldn’t actually start providing their benefits upon initial install until after a reboot.  If we add new functionality to provide even greater storage performance via a change to one of our disk filter drivers, a reboot was required after an update before the new functionality could be brought to bear.

    Until now we just lived with the restrictions.  We didn’t live with it because we couldn’t create a solution, but because we anticipated that the frequency of Windows updates, especially security-based updates, would start to increase the frequency of server reboot requirements and the problem would, for all intents and purposes, become manageable.  Alas, our hopes and dreams in this area failed to materialize. 

    We’ve been doing Windows system and especially kernel software development for decades.  I just attended Plugfest 30 for file system filter driver developers.  This is a Microsoft event to ensure high-quality standards for products with filter drivers like ours. We were also at the first Plugfest nearly two decades ago.  In addition, we also wrote the Windows NTFS file system component to allow safe, live file defragmentation for Windows NT dating back to the Windows NT 3.51 release.  That by itself is an interesting story, but I’ll leave that for another time.

    Anyway, we finally realized that our crystal ball prediction about an increase in the frequency of Windows Server reboots due to Windows Update cycles (patch Tuesday?) was a little less clear than we had hoped.  Accepting that this problem wasn’t going away, we set out to create our own Filter Manager to provide a mechanism that allowed filter drivers on stacks not supported by the Microsoft Filter Manager to be inserted and removed without the reboot requirement.  This was something we’ve been considering, talked about with other software vendors in a similar situation, and even prototyped before.  The time had finally come where we needed to facilitate our customers in getting the significant increased performance from our software immediately instead of waiting for reboot opportunities.

    We took our decades of experience and knowledge of Windows Operating System internals and experience developing Kernel software and aimed it at giving our customers the relief from this limitation.  The result is in our latest release of V-locity® 7.0, Diskeeper® 18, and SSDkeeper™ 2.0. 

    We’d love to hear your stories about how this revolutionary enablement technology has made a difference for you and your organization.


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    Let me start by stating two facts – facts that I will substantiate if you continue to the end.

    Fact #1 - Windows suffers from severe write inefficiencies that dampen overall performance. The holy grail question as to how severe is answered below.

    Fact #2, Windows is still Windows whether running in the cloud, on hyperconverged systems, all-flash storage, or all three. Before you jump to the real-world examples below, let me first explain why.

    No matter where you run Windows and no matter what kind of storage environment you run Windows on, Windows still penalizes optimal performance due to severe write inefficiencies in the hand-off of data to storage. Files are always broken down to be excessively smaller than they need to be. Since each piece means a dedicated I/O operation to process as a write or read, this means an enormous amount of noisy, unnecessary I/O traffic is chewing up precious IOPS, eroding throughput, and causing everything to run slower despite how many IOPS are at your disposal.

    How much slower?

    Now that the latest version of our I/O reduction software is being run across tens of thousands of servers and hundreds of thousands of PCs, we can empirically point out that no matter what kind of environment Windows is running on, there is always 30-40% of I/O traffic that is nothing but mere noise stealing resources and robbing optimal performance.

    Yes, there are edge cases in which the inefficiency is as little as 10% but also other edge cases where the inefficiency is upwards of 70%. That being said, the median range is solidly in the 30-40% range and it has absolutely nothing to do with the backend media whether spindle, flash, hybrid, hyperconverged, cloud, or local storage.

    Even if running Windows on an all-flash hyperconverged system, SAN or cloud environment with low latency and high IOPS, if the I/O profile isn’t addressed by our I/O reduction software to ensure large, clean, contiguous writes and reads, then 30-40% more IOPS will always be required for any given workload, which adds up to unnecessarily giving away 30-40% of the IOPS you paid for while slowing the completion of every job and query by the same amount.

    So what’s going on here? Why is this happening and how?

    First of all, the behavior of Windows when it comes to processing write and read input/output (I/O) operations is identical despite the storage backend whether local or network or media despite spindles or flash. This is because Windows only ever sees a virtual disk - the logical disk within the file system itself. The OS is abstracted from the physical layer entirely. Windows doesn’t know and doesn’t care if the underlying storage is a local disk or SSD, an array full of SSDs, hyperconverged, or cloud. In the mind of the OS, the logical disk IS the physical disk when, in fact, it’s just a reference architecture. In the case of enterprise storage, the underlying storage controllers manage where the data physically lives. However, no storage device can dictate to Windows how to write (and subsequently read) in the most efficient manner possible.

    This is why many enterprise storage controllers have their own proprietary algorithms to “clean up” the mess Windows gives it by either buffering or coalescing files on a dedicated SSD or NVRAM tier or physically move pieces of the same file to line up sequentially, which does nothing for the first penalized write nor several penalized reads after as the algorithm first needs to identify a continued pattern before moving blocks. As much as storage controller optimization helps, it’s a far cry from an actual solution because it doesn’t solve the source of the larger root cause problem - even with backend storage controller optimizations, Windows will still make the underlying server to storage architecture execute many more I/O operations than are required to write and subsequently read a file, and every extra I/O required takes a measure of time in the same way that four partially loaded dump trucks will take longer to deliver the full load versus one fully loaded dump truck. It bears repeating - no storage device can dictate to Windows how to best write and read files for the healthiest I/O profile that delivers optimum performance because only Windows controls how files are written to the logical disk. And that singular action is what determines the I/O density (or lack of) from server to storage.

    The reason this is occurring is because there are no APIs that exist between the Windows OS and underlying storage system whereby free space at the logical layer can be intelligently synced and consolidated with the physical layer without change block movement that would otherwise wear out SSDs and trigger copy-on-write activity that would blow up storage services like replication, thin provisioning, and more.

    This means Windows has no choice but to choose the next available allocation at the logical disk layer within the file systems itself instead of choosing the BEST allocation to write and subsequently read a file.

    The problem is that the next available allocation is only ever the right size on day 1 on a freshly formatted NTFS volume. But as time goes on and files are written and erased and re-written and extended and many temporary files are quickly created and erased, that means the next available space is never the right size. So, when Windows is trying to write a 1MB file but the next available allocation at the logical disk layer is 4K, it will fill that 4K, split the file, generate another I/O operation, look for the next available allocation, fill, split, and rinse and repeat until the file is fully written, and your I/O profile is cluttered with split I/Os. The result is an I/O degradation of excessively small writes and reads that penalizes performance with a “death by a thousand cuts” scenario.

    It’s for this reason, over 2,500 small, midsized, and large enterprises have deployed our I/O reduction software to eliminate all that noisy I/O robbing performance by addressing the root cause problem. Since Condusiv software sits at the storage driver level, our purview is able to supply patented intelligence to the Windows OS, enabling it to choose the BEST allocation for any file instead of the next available, which is never the right size. This ensures the healthiest I/O profile possible for maximum storage performance on every write and read. Above and beyond that benefit, our DRAM read caching engine (the same engine OEM’d by 9 of the top 10 PC manufacturers), eliminates hot reads from traversing the full stack from storage by serving it straight from idle, available DRAM. Customers who add anywhere to 4GB-16GB of memory to key systems with a read bias to get more from that engine, will offload 50-80% of all reads from storage, saving even more precious storage IOPS while serving from DRAM which is 15X faster than SSD. Those who need the most performance possible or simply need to free up more storage IOPS will max our 128GB threshold and offload 90-99% of reads from storage.

    Let’s look at some real-world examples from customers.

    Here is VDI in AWS shared by Curt Hapner (CIO, Altenloh Brinck & Co.). 63% of read traffic is being offloaded from underlying storage and 33% of write I/O operations. He was getting sluggish VDI performance, so he bumped up memory slightly on all instances to get more power from our software and the sluggishness disappeared.

    Here is an Epicor ERP with SQL backend in AWS from Altenloh Brinck & Co. 39% of reads are being eliminated along with 44% of writes to boost the performance and efficiency of their most mission critical system.

     

    Here’s from one of the largest federal branches in Washington running Windows servers on an all-flash Nutanix. 45% of reads are being offloaded and 38% of write traffic.

     

    Here is a spreadsheet compilation of different systems from one of the largest hospitality and event companies in Europe who run their workloads in Azure. The extraction of the dashboard data into the CSV shows not just the percentage of read and write traffic offloaded from storage but how much I/O capacity our software is handing back to their Azure instances.

     

    To illustrate we use the software here at Condusiv on our own systems, this dashboard screenshot is from our own Chief Architect (Rick Cadruvi), who uses Diskeeper on his SSD-powered PC. You can see him share his own production data in the recent “live demo” webinar on V-locity 7.0 - https://youtu.be/Zn2QGxBHUzs

    As you can see, 50% of reads are offloaded from his local SSD while 42% of writes operations have been saved by displacing small, fractured files with large, clean contiguous files. Not only is that extending the life of his SSD by reducing write amplification, but he has saved over 6 days of I/O time in the last month.

     

    Finally, regarding all-flash SAN storage systems, the full data is in this case study with the University of Illinois who used Condusiv I/O reduction software to more than double the performance of SQL and Oracle sitting on their all-flash arrays: http://learn.condusiv.com/rs/246-QKS-770/images/CS_University-Illinois.pdf?utm_campaign=CS_UnivIll_Case_Study

    For a free trial, visit http://learn.condusiv.com/Try-V-locity.html. For best results, bump up memory on key systems if you can and make sure to install the software on all the VMs on the same host. If you have more than 10 VMs, you may want to Contact Us for SE assistance in spinning up our centralized management console to push everything at once – a 20-min exercise and no reboot required.

    Please visit www.condusiv.com/v-locity for more than 20 case studies on how our I/O reduction software doubled the performance of mission critical applications like MS-SQL for customers of various environments.


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    You might be responsible for a busy SQL server, for example, or a Web Server; perhaps a busy file and print server, the Finance Department's systems, documentation management, CRM, BI, or something else entirely.

    Now, think about WHY these are the workloads that you care about the most?

     

    Were YOU responsible for installing the application running the workload for your company? Is the workload being run business critical, or considered TOO BIG TO FAIL?

    Or is it simply because users, or even worse, customers, complain about performance?

     

    If the last question made you wince, because you know that YOU are responsible for some of the workloads running in your organisation that would benefit from additional performance, please read on. This article is just for you, even if you don't consider yourself a "Techie".

    Before we get started, you should know that there are many variables that can affect the performance of the applications that you care about the most. The slowest, most restrictive of these is referred to as the "Bottleneck". Think of water being poured from a bottle. The water can only flow as fast as the neck of the bottle, the 'slowest' part of the bottle.

    Don't worry though, in a computer the bottleneck will pretty much always fit into one of the following categories:

    •           CPU

    •           DISK

    •           MEMORY

    •           NETWORK

    The good news is that if you're running Windows, it is usually very easy to find out which one the bottleneck is in, and here is how to do it (like an IT Engineer):

     •          Open Resource Monitor by clicking the Start menu, typing "resource monitor", and pressing Enter. Microsoft includes this as part of the Windows operating system and it is already installed.

     •          Do you see the graphs in the right-hand pane? When your computer is running at peak load, or users are complaining about performance, which of the graphs are 'maxing out'?

    This is a great indicator of where your workload's bottleneck is to be found.         

     

    SO, now you have identified the slowest part of your 'compute environment' (continue reading for more details), what can you do to improve it?

    The traditional approach to solving computer performance issues has been to throw hardware at the solution. This could be treating yourself to a new laptop, or putting more RAM into your workstation, or on the more extreme end, buying new servers or expensive storage solutions.

    BUT, how do you know when it is appropriate to spend money on new or additional hardware, and when it isn't. Well the answer is; 'when you can get the performance that you need', with the existing hardware infrastructure that you have already bought and paid for. You wouldn't replace your car, just because it needed a service, would you?

    Let's take disk speed as an example.  Let’s take a look at the response time column in Resource Monitor. Make sure you open the monitor to full screen or large enough to see the data.  Then open the Disk Activity section so you can see the Response Time column.  Do it now on the computer you're using to read this. (You didn't close Resource Monitor yet, did you?) This is showing the Disk Response Time, or put another way, how long is the storage taking to read and write data? Of course, slower disk speed = slower performance, but what is considered good disk speed and bad?

    To answer that question, I will refer to a great blog post by Scott Lowe, that you can read here...

    https://www.techrepublic.com/blog/the-enterprise-cloud/use-resource-monitor-to-monitor-storage-performance/

    In it, the author perfectly describes what to expect from faster and slower Disk Response Times:

    "Response Time (ms). Disk response time in milliseconds. For this metric, a lower number is definitely better; in general, anything less than 10 ms is considered good performance. If you occasionally go beyond 10 ms, you should be okay, but if the system is consistently waiting more than 20 ms for response from the storage, then you may have a problem that needs attention, and it's likely that users will notice performance degradation. At 50 ms and greater, the problem is serious."

    Hopefully when you checked on your computer, the Disk Response Time is below 20 milliseconds. BUT, what about those other workloads that you were thinking about earlier. What's the Disk Response Times on that busy SQL server, the CRM or BI platform, or those Windows servers that the users complain about?

    If the Disk Response Times are often higher than 20 milliseconds, and you need to improve the performance, then it's choice time and there are basically two options:

               In my opinion as an IT Engineer, the most sensible option is to use storage workload reduction software like Diskeeper for physical Windows computers, or V-locity for virtualised Windows computers. These will reduce Disk Storage Times by allowing a good percentage of the data that your applications need to read, to come from a RAM cache, rather than slower disk storage. This works because RAM is much faster than the media in your disk storage. Best of all, the only thing you need to do to try it, is download a free copy of the 30 day trial. You don't even have to reboot the computer; just check and see if it is able to bring the Disk Response Times down for the workloads that you care about the most.

               If you have tried the Diskeeper or V-locity software, and you STILL need faster disk access, then, I'm afraid, it's time to start getting quotations for new hardware. It does make sense though, to take a couple of minutes to install Diskeeper or V-locity first, to see if this step can be avoided. The software solution to remove storage inefficiencies is typically a much more cost-effective solution than having to buy hardware!

    Visitwww.condusiv.com/tryto download Diskeeper and V-locity now, for your free trial.

     


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    Need to get back to a previous version of a Microsoft Office file before the changes you just made?  Undelete has you covered with its Versioning feature.

    Have you or your users ever made some changes to a Word document, Excel spreadsheet, or a PowerPoint presentation, saved it and then realized later that what was saved did not contain the previous work? For example, and a true story, a CEO was working on a PowerPoint file he needed for a Board of Directors presentation that afternoon. He had worked about 4 hours that morning making changes and he was careful to periodically save the changes as he worked. The trouble was the last changes he saved had a large part of his previous changes accidentally overwritten.  The CEO then panicked as he just lost a majority of the 4 hours of work he just put in and was not sure he could redo it in time for his presentation deadline. He immediately called up his IT Manager who indicated the nightly backups would not help as they would not contain any of the changes he made that morning. The IT Manager then remembered he had Undelete installed on this file server. This was mainly to recover accidentally deleted files, but he recalled a Versioning feature that would allow recovery of previous versions of Microsoft Office files. He was then able use Undelete to retrieve the previous version of the CEO’s PowerPoint presentation and recover the work he did that morning. The CEO was extremely happy, and the IT Manager was a ‘hero’ to the CEO!

    Another very common scenario is users making edits to original files and then selecting “Save” instead of “Save As” and then the original files are now gone. As an example, a customer had a budget file in Excel and several people had accessed it throughout the day. At some point, someone had inadvertently made multiple changes to it for his department, including deleting sections that were not relevant to his department all the while thinking he was working in his own Save-As copy. Boy, were the other department heads upset! The way our IT Admin customer tells the story it sounded like a riot was about to erupt! Well, he swoops in just in time and recovers the earlier version in minutes and saves the day. We hear stories daily about Word document overwrites that IT Admins are able to recover the previous versions of in just a few minutes, saving users hours of having to recreate their work.

    While the most popular functionality of Undelete is the ability to recover accidentally deleted files instantly with the click of a mouse, the Undelete Versioning feature is certainly the runner up, so we wanted to remind users, or prospective users, that it’s also here to save the day for you, too.

    The Undelete Versioning feature will automatically save the previous versions of specific file types, including Microsoft Office files. The default is to save the last 5 versions, but this is settable.  Undelete then allows you to see what and when versions were saved and are then easily recoverable. A vital data protection feature to have.

    If you already have Undelete Server installed on your file servers, check out the Versioning feature. If you have any of your own “hero” stories you would like to share, email custinfo@condusiv.com

    If you don’t have Undelete Server or Undelete Pro yet, you can purchase them from your favorite online reseller or you can buy online from our store http://www.condusiv.com/purchase/Undelete/

     


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    First, let me explain exactly what the IO Blender Effect is, and why it causes a problem in virtualized environments such as those from VMware or Microsoft’s Hyper-V.



    This is typically what storage IO traffic would look like when everything is working well. You have the least number of storage IO packets, each carrying a large payload of data down to the storage. Because the data is arriving in large chunks at a time, the storage controller has the opportunity to create large stripes across its media, using the least number of storage-level operations before being able to acknowledge that the write has been successful.



    Unfortunately, all too often the Windows Write Driver is forced to split data that it’s writing into many more, much smaller IO packets. These split IO situations cause data to be transferred far less efficiently, and this adds overhead to each write and subsequent read. Now that the storage controller is only receiving data in much smaller chunks at a time, it can only create much smaller stripes across its media, meaning many more storage operations are required to process each gigabyte of storage IO traffic.


    This is not only true when writing data, but also if you need to read that data back at some later time.

    But what does this really mean in real-world terms?

    It means that an average gigabyte of storage IO traffic that should take perhaps 2,000 or 3,000 storage IO packets to complete, is now taking 30,000, or 40,000 storage IO packets instead. The data transfer has been split into many more, much smaller, fractured IO packets. Each storage IO operation that has to be generated takes a measurable amount of time and system resource to process, and so this is bad for performance! It will cause your workloads to run slower than they should, and this will worsen over time unless you perform some time and resource-costly maintenance.

    So, what about the IO Blender Effect?

    Well, the IO Blender Effect can amplify the performance penalty (or Windows IO Performance Tax) in a virtualized environment. Here’s how it works…

     

    As the small, fractured IO traffic from several virtual machines passes through the physical host hypervisor (Hyper-V server or VMware ESX server), the hypervisor acts like a blender. It mixes these IO streams, which causes a randomization of the storage IO packets, before sending out what is now a chaotic mess of small, fractured and now very random IO streams out to the storage controller.

    It doesn’t matter what type of storage you have on the back-end. It could be direct attached disks in the physical host machine, or a Storage Area Network (SAN), this type of storage IO profile couldn’t be less storage-friendly.

    The storage is now only receiving data in small chunks at a time, and won’t understand the relationship between the packets, so it now only has the opportunity to create very small stripes across its media, and that unfortunately means many more storage operations are required before it can send an acknowledgement of the data transfer back up to the Windows operating system that originated it.

    How can RAM caching alleviate the problem?

     

    Firstly, to be truly effective the RAM caching needs to be done at the Windows operating system layer. This provides the shortest IO path for read IO requests that can be satisfied from server-side RAM, provisioned to each virtual machine. By satisfying as many “Hot Reads” from RAM as possible, you now have a situation where not only are those read requests being satisfied faster, but those requests are now not having to go out to storage. That means less storage IO packets for the hypervisor to blend.

    Furthermore, the V-locity® caching software from Condusiv Technologies also employs a patented technology called IntelliWrite®. This intelligently helps the Windows Write Driver make better choices when writing data out to disk, which avoids many of the split IO situations that would then be made worse by the IO Blender Effect. You now get back to that ideal situation of healthy IO; large, sequential writes and reads.

    Is RAM caching a disruptive solution?

     

    No! Not at all, if done properly.

    Condusiv’s V-locity software for virtualised environments is completely non-disruptive to live, running workloads such as SQL Servers, Microsoft Dynamics, Business Information (BI) solutions such as IBM Cognos, or other important workloads such as SAP, Oracle and the such.

    In fact, all you need to do to test this for yourself is download a free trialware copy from:

    www.condusiv.com/try

    Just install it! There are no reboots required, and it will start working in just a couple of minutes. If you decide that it isn’t for you, then uninstall it just as easily. No reboots, no disruption!



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    Our latest V-locity®,Diskeeper® and SSDkeeper® products include a built-in dashboard that reports the benefits our software is providing.  There are tabs in the dashboard that allow users to view very granular data that can help them assess the impact of our software.  In the dashboard Analytics tab we display hourly data for 13 key metrics.  This document describes what those metrics are and why we chose them as key to understanding your storage performance, which directly translates to your application performance.

    To start with, let’s spend a moment  trying to understand why 24-hour graphs matter.  When you, and/or your users really notice bottlenecks is generally during peak usage periods.  While some servers are truly at peak usage 24x7,  most systems, including servers, have peak I/O periods.  These almost always follow peak user activity.  

    Sometimes there will be spikes also in the overnight hours when you are doing backups, virus scans, large report/data maintenance jobs, etc.  While these may not be your major concern, some of our customers find that these overlap their daytime production and therefore can easily be THE major source of concern.  For some people, making these happen before the deluge of daytime work starts, is the single biggest factor they deal with.

    Regardless of what causes the peaks, it is at those peak moments when performance matters most.  When little is happening, performance rarely matters.  When a lot is happening, it is key.  The 24-hour graphs allow you to visually see the times when performance matters to you.  You can also match metrics during specific hours to see where the bottlenecks are and what technologies of ours are most effective during those hours. 

    Let’s move on to the actual metrics.

     

    Total I/Os Eliminated

     

    Total I/Os eliminated measures the number of I/Os that would have had to go through to storage if our technologies were not eliminating them before they ever got sent to storage.  We eliminate I/Os in one of two ways.  First, via our patented IntelliMemory® technology, we satisfy I/Os from memory without the request ever going out to the storage device.  Second, several of our other technologies, such as IntelliWrite® cause the data to be stored more efficiently and densely so that when data is requested, it takes less I/Os to get the same amount of data as would otherwise be required.  The net effect is that your storage subsystems see less actual I/Os sent to them because we eliminated the need for those extra I/Os.  That allows those I/Os that do go to storage to finish faster because they aren’t waiting on the eliminated I/Os to complete.

     

    IOPS

    IOPS stands for I/Os Per Second.  It is the number of I/OS that you are actually requesting.  During the times with the most activity, I/Os eliminated actually causes this number to be much higher than would be possible with just your storage subsystem.  It is also a measure of the total amount of work your applications/systems are able to accomplish.

     

    Data from Cache (GB)

    Data from cache tells you how much of that total throughput was satisfied directly from cache.  This can be deceiving.  Our caching algorithms are aimed at eliminating a lot of small noisy I/Os that jam up the storage subsystem works.  By not having to process those, the data freeway is wide open.  This is like a freeway with accidents.  Even though the cars have moved to the side, the traffic slows dramatically.  Our cache is like accident avoidance.  It may be just a subset of the total throughput, but you process a LOT more data because you aren’t waiting for those noisy, necessary I/Os that hold your applications/systems back.

    Throughput (GB Total)

    Throughput is the total amount of data you process and is measured in GigaBytes.  Think of this like a freight train.  The more railcars, the more total freight being shipped.  The higher the throughput, the more work your system is doing.

     

    Throughput (MB/Sec)

    Throughput is a measure of the total volume of data flowing to/from your storage subsystem.  This metric measures throughput in MegaBytes per second kind of like your speedometer versus your odometer.

    I/O Time Saved (seconds)

    The I/O Time Saved metric tells you how much time you didn’t have to wait for I/Os to complete because of the physical I/Os we eliminated from going to storage.  This can be extremely important during your busiest times.  Because I/O requests overlap across multiple processes and threads, this time can actually be greater than elapsed clock time.  And what that means to you is that the total amount of work that gets done can actually experience a multiplier effect because systems and applications tend to multitask.  It’s like having 10 people working on sub-tasks at the same time.  The projects finish much faster than if 1 person had to do all the tasks for the project by themselves.  By allowing pieces to be done by different people and then just plugging them altogether you get more done faster.  This metric measures that effect.

     

    I/O Response Time

    I/O Response time is sometimes referred to as Latency.  It is how long it takes for I/Os to complete.  This is generally measured in milliseconds.  The lower the number, the better the performance.

    Read/Write %

    Read/Write % is the percentage of Reads to Writes.  If it is at 75%, 3 out of every 4 I/Os are Reads to each Write.  If it were 25%, then it would signify that there are 3 Writes per each Read.

     

    Read I/Os Eliminated

    This metric tells you how many Read I/Os we eliminated.  If your Read to Write ratio is very high, this may be one of the most important metrics for you.  However, remember that eliminating Writes means that Reads that do go to storage do NOT have to wait for those writes we eliminated to complete.  That means they finish faster.  Of course, the same is true that Reads eliminated improves overall Read performance.

    % Read I/Os Eliminated

     

    % Read I/Os Eliminated tells you what percentage of your overall Reads were eliminated from having to be processed at all by your storage subsystem.

     

    Write I/Os Eliminated

    This metric tells you how many Write I/Os we eliminated.  This is due to our technologies that improve the efficiency and density of data being stored by the Windows NTFS file system.

    % Write I/Os Eliminated 

     

    % Write I/Os Eliminated tells you what percentage of your overall Writes were eliminated from having to be processed at all by your storage subsystem.

    Fragments Prevented and Eliminated

    Fragments Prevented and Eliminated gives you an idea of how we are causing data to be stored more efficiently and dense, thus allowing Windows to process the same amount of data with far fewer actual I/Os.

    If you have our latest versions of V-locity, Diskeeper or SSDkeeper installed, you can open the Dashboard now and select the Analytics tab and see all of these metrics.

    If you don’t have the latest version installed and you have a current maintenance agreement, login to your online account to download and install the software.

    Not a customer yet and want to checkout these dashboard metrics, download a free trial at www.condusiv.com/try.


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    Over time as more files and applications are added to your system, you notice that performance has degraded, and you want to find out what is causing it. A good starting point is to see how the system resources are being used and which processes and/or files are using them.

    Diskeeper contains a lesser known feature to assist you on this. It is called the System Monitoring Report which can show you how the CPU and I/O resources are being utilized, then digging down a bit deeper, which processes or files are using them.

    Under Reports on the Main Menu, the System Monitoring Report provides you with data on the system’s CPU usage and I/O Activity.

     

    The CPU Usage report takes the average CPU usage from the past 7 days, then provides a graph of the hourly usage on an average day. You can then see at which times the CPU resources are being hit the most and by how much.

    Digging down some more, you can then see which processes utilized the most CPU resources.

     

    The Disk I/O Activity report takes the average disk I/O activity from the past 7 days, then provides a graph of the hourly activity on an average day. You can then determine at which times the I/O activity is the highest.

    Digging down some more, you can then see which processes utilized the I/O resources the most, plus what processes are causing the most split (extra) I/Os.

     

    You can also see which file types have the highest I/O utilization as well as those causing the most split (extra) I/Os.  This can help indicate what files and related processes are causing this type of extra I/O activity.

     

    So, if you are trying to see how your system is being used, maybe for performance issues, this report gives you a quick and easy look on how the CPU and Disk I/O resources are being used on your system and what processes and file types are using them. This along with some other Microsoft Utilities, like Task Manager and Performance Monitor can help you tune your system for optimum performance.


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